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Vergeworlds - The Physics and Tactics of Warfare Between Separate Wormhole Networks

A description about how two wormhole networks would fight in my Vergeworlds setting

The Physics and Tactics of Warfare Between Separate Wormhole Networks
Synopsis

  • It is difficult for an attacker from one wormhole network to capture worlds from another network in a timely manner.
    By destroying the wormhole to a conquered world, the defender can greatly slow down the attacker.
  • The best way for an attacker to attack across a broken wormhole is to exploit any back doors that also link back to the same world.
  • The Squirm used the wormhole communication system of the Mants and Gummis to get around broken wormhole links.
  • Humans don't use wormholes for communication in the same way, so Squirm have been known to clandestinely abduct Humans, infect them with a mind-control parasite, implant a miniature wormhole in them, and set them loose to return home before beginning their invasion, in order to prevent a broken wormhole from stopping their advance.

We have already seen that when a metropole projects out wormholes to colonies, the connection from the metropole to the colony takes you considerably forward in time as well as through space. For example, if the metropole and colony are 100 light years apart, going from the metropole to the colony will take you nearly a century into the future.

Now suppose the Squirm capture the colony. The metropole will want to immediately break the wormhole to the colony. They can always project another wormhole if they want to counter-attack, which will connect across the same time-lag … from the point of view of the colony and the metropole, only as much time will have elapsed as it takes for the wormhole mouth to travel there (0.1414 years, in the above example). On the other hand, if the Squirm want to advance onto the metropole, they will need to project their own wormhole. But they're already nearly 100 years ahead in time compared to the metropole – projecting their own wormhole back the other way would result in connecting to a time coordinate nearly another 100 years ahead of the colony's time. This gives the metropole two centuries to prepare for the invasion. Two centuries of industrial output and military buildup, to fight off an invasion force which the Squirm only have a month and a half to prepare for. Therefore, the major objective of the Squirm will be to capture the wormhole before it can be destroyed, and clamp it open. Otherwise, their invasion of the metropole will almost always fail.

In the wars of the Squirm with the Zox and the Gummis, the Squirm were able to exploit a back door. Both the Zox Hierate and the Gummis used Antecessor technology, including ultra-miniaturized wormholes. These tiny wormholes were used for wormhole phones. A phone connected to a base station via a wormhole, allowing nearly instantaneous communication between the phone and the station. The station can then route your call to any other wormhole phone connected to the same station, or to other stations using wormholes between stations. The station ensures time-balancing via time dilation of either end (using miniature cyclotron-like devices based on affectors) or, in extremis, lengthening the wormhole throat. This avoids causality-related collapse in a wormhole-rich environment.

Taking a wormhole phone through another wormhole automatically avoids issues with causality and allows you to communicate instantly across interstellar distances, since the phone wormhole picks up the exact same time lag as the transit wormhole as it goes through. This made them popular with travelers. When a Squirm captured a phone a traveler was using, however, this gave them a wormhole link back to the phone's station which they could enlarge and send an invasion through.

Humans don't use wormhole phones. They use microwave transmissions and fiber-optic guided lasers. At first, this stymied the Squirm in their war with the Humans of the Indian bough. They hit upon an insidious solution, though. They developed a mind-control parasite that infected Humans and Pannovas. Before beginning an invasion, they would covertly locate a Human (Pannovas were very rare in the Indian bough) from a different world, abduct him or her, infect him or her with the parasite, and implant a miniaturized wormhole. The parasite instilled an overwhelming desire to return home. Only when the target arrived home would the Squirm invasion begin, providing them with a concealed route to different Human worlds.

In the Verge, all polities forbid taking wormhole phones through wormholes. Human technology is used exclusively for inter-world communication (usually routed through the main transport wormhole). This is one of the few Human technologies the Zox will use. Even the Gummis, with their lack of most authoritarian political organizations, form public health and safety committees that enforce this ban – usually with the enthusiastic support of the public since Gummis remember all too well the devastation of the Squirm. In the Verge Republic, Transit Law and FERA are responsible for detecting, tracking down, and neutralizing parasite-controlled travelers. Transit Law is also tasked with identifying and neutralizing covert Squirm operations before they can capture and infect citizens. Local law enforcement and health authorities also act to prevent and intercept infected people in their jurisdiction before they can become a threat.

It is worth noting that if two distinct networks connect to each other with more than one wormhole, it will form a closed loop. This initiates a causality attack, and the weakest link within that loop will break. This may well result in some of the worlds changing which network they belong to. The Gummis used this tactic extensively in their war with the Squirm. This allowed them to break pieces off the Squirm network and defeat them piecemeal, isolated from assistance of the concentrated force of the Squirm armed forces.
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